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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of The language of human rights in West Germany found in the catalog.

The language of human rights in West Germany

Lora Wildenthal

The language of human rights in West Germany

by Lora Wildenthal

  • 153 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by University of Pennsylvania Press in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Human rights,
  • German language,
  • Human rights advocacy,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementLora Wildenthal
    SeriesPennsylvania studies in human rights, Pennsylvania studies in human rights
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsJC599.G3 W56 2013
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25307467M
    ISBN 109780812244489
    LC Control Number2012016199

    [Human dignity – Human rights – Legally binding force of basic rights] (1) Human dignity shall be inviolable. To respect and protect it shall be the duty of all state authority. (2) The German people therefore acknowledge inviolable and inalienable human rights as the basis of every community, of peace and of justice in the world. Human rights in Germany enjoy a high level of protection, both in theory and in practice, and are enshrined in the country has ratified most international human rights treaties. Reports from independent organizations such as Amnesty International certify a high level of compliance with human rights, while still pointing out several issues, in particular police brutality and.

    Despite the scarce mentioning of language learning that seems to go uncontested in human rights academia, most often than not, if you are seeking international human rights work, you will be required to speak another language given the very international nature of what you are pursuing.   The Wall in Berlin is unique because its object is to prevent the men and women behind it from reaching freedom.” 24 Angry polemics against violations of East German human rights became a staple of Cold War rhetoric in the West, especially in West Germany, complete with photographs of ominous guard towers and barbed-wired no-go zones. 25 No.

    What Are Human Rights? Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, regardless of race, sex, nationality, ethnicity, language, religion, or any other status. Human rights include the. The establishment of the Human Rights Council has frequently been heralded as the beginning of a new era for the protection and promotion of human rights in the UN system: the achievements, such as the system of independent experts and Special Procedures, of the Human Rights Commission were clearly recognised and carried forward to the new body.


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The language of human rights in West Germany by Lora Wildenthal Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book examines that language of human rights in the particular setting of West Germany (). Through a set of stories, it shows why various people chose human rights as the language of their idealism, and what specific kinds of content they attached to that abstract language.

Why should we talk about a language of human rights?Cited by: The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II.

Some human rights organizations and advocates sought to critically examine the Nazi past as a form of basic rights education. Others developed arguments for the rights of Germans—especially expellees—who were victims of the Allies.

Author: LoraWildenthal. West Germans have used the language of human rights to redefine the conditions of justice in their own state as well as abroad.

Attending to that local usage of the language of human rights, this book will not make a strong distinction between civil liberties advocacy and human rights advocacy.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II. Some human rights organizations and advocates sought to critically examine the Nazi past as a form of basic rights education.

This book treats human rights as a political language and shows that human rights advocates in one particular setting, West Germany between World War II and unification, ranged across a very wide political spectrum. The Language of Human Rights in West Germany Lora Wildenthal.

pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | ISBN | $s | Outside the Americas £ Ebook editions are available from selected online vendors A volume in the series Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights View table of contents and excerpt.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II.

Lora Wildenthal demonstrates that human rights comprise a political language, best understood in its own domestic and historical context. Human Rights Activism in Occupied and Early West Germany: The Case of the German League for Human Rights; 2.

Rudolf Laun and “German Human Rights” in Occupied and Early West Germany; 3. Human Rights Activism as Domestic Politics: The International League for Human Rights, West German Amnesty, and the Humanist Union Confront Adenauer’s.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany by Lora Wildenthal Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, Jennifer Illuzzi 1 Human Rights Review volume  15,  pages –. In the aftermath of Nazism, genocide, and Allied occupation, and amid Cold War and national division, West Germans were especially obliged to confront issues of rights and international law.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II. Some human rights organizations and advocates sought to.

“A decade ago the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) received a certificate from the Guinness Book of Records as the most translated document in the world.

Back then, the UDHR was available in languages and dialects, from Abkhaz to Zulu. Since then, the UN Human Rights office has received a constant flow of translations.

Summary: The Language of Human Rights in West Germany traces the four most important purposes for which West Germans invoked human rights after World War II.

Lora Wildenthal demonstrates that human rights comprise a political language, best understood in its own domestic and historical context. (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

human rights law have not only provided the foundation for the contents of the present book, but also hopefully opened a new vista of human rights law insight for the readers including students, teachers, lawyers, judges, scholars, human rights activists, social development planners, politicians, governmental.

Prior to the formulation of modern human rights were the 18 th Century French and US Declarations, both of which provided guided aspects of the language and content of the cornerstone of modern human rights, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) (Brown43; Kobila).

The French and US Declarations, as well as the UDHR. Human rights are rights that each and every one of us possess by the simple fact that we are human beings. Given the close link between language, culture, identity and participation in community life, the right to express ourselves in our language is a fundamental right.

The Language of Human Rights in West Germany by Lora Wildenthal Article in Human Rights Review 15(3) September with 8 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Human rights. Some things are non-negotiable: Germany continues to campaign assiduously for human rights around the world.

Indeed, working for human rights is. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 1) Language family: Indo-European: Germanic. The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, East, West and Southern Africa, and South and South East Asia, parts of the Pacific, and parts of South America.

Who were the Nazis. The Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers’ Party – NSDAP) grew out of a German Workers’ Party. The Nazi party came into power in April of They were under the leadership of a World War I veteran, Adolf Hitler Above: Adolf Hitler, leader of the.

Richardson-Little shows how the SED was threatened by the deployment of human rights language in anti-communist propaganda in the West and deployed the same language against West Germany. In practice, the SED remained bound to a nineteenth-century conception of rights as self-imposed limitations of state power.Human rights recognize the dignity inherent in every person as a human being, regardless of his or her particular nationality, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality, class or.

The origins of the “crimes against humanity“ and “genocide“ phrases are so interesting, and the background from Sands’s research is amazing. The book is unlike anything I have read, a great and highly praised nonfiction narrative. Readers interested in history, the Nuremberg trials, or human rights will find this book indispensable.